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Scott Poole, Monsters win 2012 John G. Cawelti award from PCA/ACA

February 28th, 2012 by admin

Congratulations are in order for one W. Scott Poole, who was recently announced as this year's recipient of the John G. Cawelti award for best textbook/primer from the Popular Culture and American Culture associations. Scott will be presented with the award at the PCA/ACA annual meeting in Boston this April.

Scott blogs and posts all recent news (and events) at monstersinamerica.com.

Poole's Monsters earns Rondo Award nomination

February 16th, 2012 by admin

Rondo awardsWe've just been given word that Scott Poole's Monsters in America: Our Historical Obsession with the Hideous and the Haunting was nominated for a Rondo Award.

What's a Rondo Award, you ask? According to RondoAward.com, "The Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards were created by David Colton and Kerry Gammill at the Classic Horror Film Boards in 2002. The awards are fan-based, and have no connection to any commercial sponsor. Anyone in fandom can vote or propose nominees.

"Votes for the TENTH Annual awards, for work appearing in 2011, began on Feb. 23, 2012 and will continue through Sunday at midnight, April 1, 2012. Winners will be announced here and on the CHFB on April 3, 2012."

If you think the book is worthy, click the creep head trophies to the left, and, if you haven't gotten your copy of Monsters in America, consider the Kindle edition!

Monsters in America is now available

October 14th, 2011 by admin

The wait is finally over! This weekend, a haunting has come to your bookstore. Monsters in America: Our Historical Obsession with the Hideous and the Haunting by W. Scott Poole is now available in time for a fun Halloween read. 

Beginning next week, Scott will also be traveling to bookstores and other awesome venues, including the Music Box Theatre in Chicago, signing books and talking about monsters. Track his progress and find out when he'll be visiting a city near you at monstersinamerica.com

Do you have a book club or group that would like to read Monsters in America? Check out our group and classroom guides at monstersinamerica.com as well, and find out how you can schedule Scott to speak with your group. 

Audio review: Monsters in America

October 11th, 2011 by admin

"Have you ever looked at Frankenstein's monster as a personification of racism after the Reconstruction following the U.S. Civil War?" Well, Scott Poole did, and according to the folks over at A Little Dead Podcast, Poole has done his research in constructing one brilliant book:

"Poole is obviously a fan of horror who has done his research. ... This is a great, insightful, and inspiring read. ... It is most definitely a buy. Get a copy and read it, and I'm sure you'll agree with me that it's an awesome text."

You can listen to the entire review online using the link below.

A Little Dead Podcast [see minute 28:55]

College of Charleston News: Professor turns love of monsters into new book

October 10th, 2011 by admin

From the College of Charleston News & Events page:

College of Charleston history professor Scott Poole grew up in love with monsters. He translated his love for them into a career as a historian, author, and pop culture critic. On October 15, 2011, in the middle of the most monsterific month of the year, Poole will release his sixth book, [Monsters in America:] Our Historical Obsession with the Hideous and the Haunting.

"With Monsters in America, W. Scott Poole has given us a guidebook for a journey into nightmare territory. Insightful and brilliant!" says Jonathan Maberry, New York Times bestselling author of Patient Zero and Dead of Night.

Monsters in America uniquely brings together history and culture studies to expose the dark obsessions that have helped create our national identity. Consulting newspaper accounts, archival materials, personal papers, comic books, films, and oral histories, Scott Poole has crafted an engrossing, and entirely unique, history of America, one that nimbly illustrates how the creation of the monstrous "other" not only reflects society's fears but shapes actual historical behavior.

The full text of this article can be found here.

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